Explaining the buzzword: ‘plant-based’

The ‘plant-based’ diet consists of foods derived from plant sources; this can include fruit, vegetables, grains, pulses, legumes, nuts and meat substitutes such as soy products.

The term ‘plant-based’ does not mean vegetarian or vegan. A person that consumes a ‘plant-based’ diet may also eat small amounts of dairy, meat or fish.

Grain-based diets started 10,000 years ago. “60% of calories that fuel humanity come from the seeds of three grass species; wheat, rice and corn.”* Humans have done and always will consume a ‘plant-based’ diet.

So with a a majority of us already eating a ‘plant-based’ diet, what is this infamous buzzword trying to convey? (Aside from being a marketing ploy aimed at middle-class people that assume that it’s living off avocados, ‘ancient grains’ and bistro salads). Basically a ‘plant-based’ diet is preferable for the sustainability of the planet and for your own well-being. Quite simply, eat less meat. This will significantly reduce emissions and help our planet in the long-term. An introduction into a good, well-rounded diet is to use slow cooker recipes that use cheaper, smaller cuts of meat or choose recipes that have no meat at all, for a minimum of 1-3 meals a week.

Be wary of the buzzword ‘plant-based’ though. It doesn’t automatically mean ‘healthy’. Many influencers use it to promote fad diets that can leave people nutrient deficient or have them gain weight as they aren’t eating correctly; it can also cause digestive issues.

It’s also used in marketing to sell packaged foods e.g. vegan pizza, salad bowls etc. This is detrimental as these foods aren’t ‘healthy’ just because they have ‘plant-based’ written on. Making your own meals and infrequently supplementing them with packaged foods is a reasonable idea for any working, busy individual or family.

Statistic: *James Wong. 2018. Twitter.

Here’s hoping that ‘Bigfoot’ could exist

In a world where a large, ape-like creature could possibly exist is a world that I dream of living in; large forests, woodlands, green cities filled with flora and an abundance of wild, natural landscapes. Bigfoot should be able to hide from us, undetected, in the darkest deepest corners of wild areas.

This isn’t the world that we currently live in. “In the UK, 97 per cent of our hay meadows and wild grasslands have been wiped out since the 1930s (The Wildlife Trusts).” We can almost confirm that Bigfoot doesn’t exist as its ‘supposed’ habitat is divided by grey roads, towns and cities. Whatever Bigfoot eats, I’m pretty sure it’s not concrete or tarmac. Further to this, “The world has lost just over half of its biodiversity – 52 per cent since 1970 (Living Planet Report, 2014 WWF),”; a shocking percentage. We haven’t left room for enough plants or trees that create these desired environments; let alone space for any undiscovered species of ape.

How to help:

  1. Leaving parts of your garden ‘wild’ and ‘un-manicured’. By this I mean: letting the grass grow, sowing wild flower seeds, leave brambles/’weeds’ and encourage a meadow-like vibe.
  2. Leave hedgerows and trees to thrive. Don’t replace them with fencing (unless necessary).
  3. Increase native planting in your borders, containers and in the lawn itself. I use Penlan nursery as a guide on British native perennials.
  4. Increase amount of planting overall; fill borders, containers etc to the maximum. Watch the amount of weeding, tidying and work you have to do on the border decrease and the amount of wildlife increase dramatically.
  5. Grow fruit and vegetables.
  6. Visit conservation areas, wetland centres, moors/grasslands etc for inspiration but also to support these charities; this will help these areas thrive.
  7. Volunteer for ‘In Bloom’, the Forestry Commission or local horticulture groups; all who are trying to keep environments green and not grey.

This list seems so trivial, but it’s a small step towards bigger plans. Imagine every UK garden as a haven for wildlife and flora; this in turn will create an abundance of green space that will start to spread into large towns and cities. At the moment, I can walk a mile without seeing a plant and this drastically needs to change.

Article inspired by ‘Wild Thing‘ a podcast by Laura Krantz and Foxtopus. Ink.

Also inspired by Singapore, written about in this National Geographic article: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/urban-expeditions/green-buildings/green-urban-landscape-cities-Singapore/


Starting out as a gardener

I began my gardening career in 2015, I took on a few general maintenance clients and did some work experience with various companies. It was great, but without a network of people to learn from/aspire too, I was lost.

What I’ve learnt in these past few years:

  1. Be energetic, enthusiastic and friendly. Interacting with customers and other gardeners is useful; it builds strong relationships that can provide future work.
  2. Create a Twitter/Instagram account and connect with fellow horticulturists on there. Read their blogs and listen to their podcasts because you will learn a lot!
  3. Never turn down an opportunity! Use the connections you build in person/on social media to go on courses/find work experience/expand your knowledge.
  4. Knowing what tools are necessary; take a look at my toolkit blog here.
  5. PPE is absolutely necessary.

Finally, garden maintenance is a great place to begin in horticulture, you learn a lot more about plants and from doing a job than you do from just reading about it.

Being a young female on the Internet

The blog title made you worry and start reading this, didn’t it…

Three-quarters of women and girls expect abuse if they post an opinion about politics or current affairs online. People tell you to watch yourself online; be on your best behaviour if you’re going to ‘put yourself out there’.

55% of women suffer anxiety and a sense of powerlessness from this abuse.

I recently wrote a blog about the everyday sexism I receive as a young female horticulturist doing what is perceived as a ‘man’s job’. This article was viewed and read by many different people who agreed that these comments are absurd, misogynistic and patronising.

Then I received more comments.. an influx of direct messages from (in this case but not always) men offering their opinion on the situation:

  1. I was asked where I lived
  2. What my dad does for a living and if I worked for his company
  3. Told I had to meet up with them so they could share their opinions face to face
  4. They tried to add my personal accounts on Facebook, Instagram etc
  5. Made personal comments about my appearance
  6. Sent harassing, inappropriate comments that I have blocked them for
  7. Emailed me for not replying on social media
  8. Being aggressively abused for not replying to the email

The blog I wrote was a personal article on how misogyny affects me; I don’t regret posting it even when people were telling me to watch what I say because it could make others perceive me negatively.

I felt enriched after many of you agreed with me, saying it affected you too but not letting it bring you down and powering through it, consistently breaking stereotypes and changing the world. To contrast this, the horrible comments left me feeling powerless, intimidated and enraged; it proves my point even more and highlights how dangerous the world can be when it escalates from being ‘harmless’ comments.

Statistics from Amnesty International’s latest report, link here.

Favourite seeds for 2018

I have three medium sized vegetable beds. One of these is filled with strawberries, blackcurrants, raspberries, a gooseberry and dahlias; the other two are empty and ready for spring.

Sorting through the seeds I’ve been hoarding over the past few months and I’ve found some that I am so excited to try and grow!

It can be easy to sow seeds that are tried and tested; each year I choose a few that are new and unfamiliar to me.

  1. Tomato ‘Black Russian’
  2. Tomato ‘Yellow Pear’
  3. Kale ‘Dwarf Green Curled’
  4. Broccoli ‘White Sprouting Early’
  5. Pumpkin ‘Munchkin’
  6. Squash ‘Turks Turban’
  7. Borlotti Bean ‘Lingua de Fuoco 2’
  8. Kohl Rabi ‘Delicacy Purple’
  9. Samphire
  10. Trachymene Coerulea ‘Blue Lace Flower’
  11. Nasturtium ‘Empress of India’
  12. Dill

Let me know the new seeds that you are trying this year on Twitter or Instagram @eogardening.

Spoon carving

I’ve always had a fascination with wood, grain and trees; it’s exciting to combine it all by carving. I began studying this craft 2017 to use up wood that I was removing from garden clearances (with permission).

I’ve been using different resources to expand my carving knowledge. A few of my favourite carvers for tips/tricks/instruction are:

  1. Barn the spoon
  2. Spoonesaurus by Matt White and Emmet Van Driesche
  3. Spoon carving with Tom

Tools for the job:

  1. Mora 106 carving knife
  2. Robin Wood hook knife
  3. Axe
  4. Sharpening kit inc. sandpaper, Tormek and leather/suede strop

Wood for carving should be green and soft. I prefer carving with birch, cherry and have used apple.

I like to try and make different spoons e.g. cooking, scoops, eating, spatulas, coffee, serving. It’s interesting to draw and design the shape.

Follow @eogcarve on Instagram for updates!

‘The plastics’ – mean girls of gardening?

The use of plastic is a huge debate in gardening right now. Us gardeners create wonderful gardens for wildlife and grow our own vegetables to avoid buying too much plastic but we sow our seeds in plastic trays and buy plants in plastic pots? This should change!

Plastic has filled our oceans and landfills. It takes hundreds of years to break down and we use it for the convenience.

Module trays, flower pots, compost bags, seed trays, compost bins… the list continues. I’ve heard that Monty Don has commented on the over-use of plastics however, as he hasn’t mentioned any, here are some alternatives.

I won’t suggest using terracotta pots as they are expensive; they are also heavy; people with limited mobility need lighter materials that can be handled easily. On the other hand, they are worth the money if they are available to you.

  1. Flowerpots:
    • Make your own 9cm pots using a paper pot maker and newspaper
    • Recycle cardboard tubes from toilet/kitchen rolls
    • Buy biodegradable peat-free fibre pots
    • Buy The Hairy Pot Plant Company from local stockists, link here. Great company and great plants! They also sell hairy pots without plants in; look here!
    • Make your own using cement mix, vermiculite and coir. Blog to follow on this soon.
  2. Seed trays:
    • Biodegradable coir seed trays, available here.
    • Wooden seed trays
  3. Plant labels:
    • Try to use plant labels made of slate, bamboo, aluminium, copper or oak. Interestingly, pencil becomes permanent when used on aluminium.
  4. Compost:
    • Best peat-free compost I’ve ever used is Dalefoot; check it here. It does come in plastic bags but these can be used to make your own leaf mould compost.
  5. Compost bins:
    • Make your own using wooden stakes; hammer these into the ground and staple chicken wire to it to create a wire frame
    • Use old pallets for an entirely wooden bin
    • Reuse one-trip bulk bags
  6. Dibbers:
    • Wooden or metal dibbers are available to buy
    • You could whittle your own wooden one (be careful when using sharp knives)!

Thought of anything else? Let me know on Twitter or Instagram @eogardening.