GROW: Spring bulbs

There’s an abundance of spring bulbs growing in the english countryside; it provides colour in the garden from the beginning of the year.

This autumn, I’ve bought alliums, daffodils and tulips from Peter Nyssen to plant in a border that I created last summer.

The border is filled with perennial grasses, ferns, sedums, geraniums, gypsophila and brunnera; meaning it lacks colour/foliage from late winter-early spring. The bulbs will fill this gap!

My choices:

  1. Allium Roseum
  2. Allium Carinatum Pulchellum
  3. Narcissus Thalia
  4. Tulip Antartica
  5. Tulip Black Bean
  6. Tulip Gabriella

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Spring bulbs are easy to grow and when purchased should be planted at the correct planting depth stated on the packet. New bulbs should be planted every year to supplement the original.

 

Front Gardens

Utilising space is hugely important when it’s limited. Front gardens are a wasted space that aren’t viewed as a ‘garden’ and only a driveway or place to put the bins. However, understandably, we need a place to park our cars; not all front gardens can be completely ‘green’.

The simple solution is unimaginative. Front gardens are just paved over with concrete, slabs or tarmac; this creates drainage problems and makes urban areas look grey and dismal. The idea of low maintenance is too popular.

Gardeners around the country are crying out to see thriving front gardens that are bursting with colour and wildlife!

Currently:

  • Paved over
  • Place to park cars
  • Identical to the neighbours
  • Boring
  • Untidy

Goals:

  • Wildlife friendly
  • Productive
  • Useful
  • Unique
  • Permeable surface

Front gardens are often very small; container planting is popular in urban areas where space is limited. There’s a huge list of plants that can be easily grown in pots that will also provide for bees/birds/butterflies! List here. I recommend plants such as lavender, salvia, achillea, nepeta and annuals e.g. sunflowers, cornflowers etc. Vegetables are also easily grown in pots; these will provide for you as well as wildlife. Make use of vertical space. Use trellis to allow climbers to grow; runner beans, sweet peas etc are easy to grow and crop perpetually throughout summer.

Larger front gardens are great for small ‘allotments’. An allotment is productive, wildlife friendly and it’s aesthetically pleasing! Vegetables, cutting flowers and fruits can be grown easily however always check the aspect and plant accordingly. If you desire a low maintenance garden, there is a healthy list of perennial plants and shrubs that attract wildlife and don’t need much attention. List here.