Starting out as a gardener

I began my gardening career in 2015, I took on a few general maintenance clients and did some work experience with various companies. It was great, but without a network of people to learn from/aspire too, I was lost.

What I’ve learnt in these past few years:

  1. Be energetic, enthusiastic and friendly. Interacting with customers and other gardeners is useful; it builds strong relationships that can provide future work.
  2. Create a Twitter/Instagram account and connect with fellow horticulturists on there. Read their blogs and listen to their podcasts because you will learn a lot!
  3. Never turn down an opportunity! Use the connections you build in person/on social media to go on courses/find work experience/expand your knowledge.
  4. Knowing what tools are necessary; take a look at my toolkit blog here.
  5. PPE is absolutely necessary.

Finally, garden maintenance is a great place to begin in horticulture, you learn a lot more about plants and from doing a job than you do from just reading about it.

Being a young female on the Internet

The blog title made you worry and start reading this, didn’t it…

Three-quarters of women and girls expect abuse if they post an opinion about politics or current affairs online. People tell you to watch yourself online; be on your best behaviour if you’re going to ‘put yourself out there’.

55% of women suffer anxiety and a sense of powerlessness from this abuse.

I recently wrote a blog about the everyday sexism I receive as a young female horticulturist doing what is perceived as a ‘man’s job’. This article was viewed and read by many different people who agreed that these comments are absurd, misogynistic and patronising.

Then I received more comments.. an influx of direct messages from (in this case but not always) men offering their opinion on the situation:

  1. I was asked where I lived
  2. What my dad does for a living and if I worked for his company
  3. Told I had to meet up with them so they could share their opinions face to face
  4. They tried to add my personal accounts on Facebook, Instagram etc
  5. Made personal comments about my appearance
  6. Sent harassing, inappropriate comments that I have blocked them for
  7. Emailed me for not replying on social media
  8. Being aggressively abused for not replying to the email

The blog I wrote was a personal article on how misogyny affects me; I don’t regret posting it even when people were telling me to watch what I say because it could make others perceive me negatively.

I felt enriched after many of you agreed with me, saying it affected you too but not letting it bring you down and powering through it, consistently breaking stereotypes and changing the world. To contrast this, the horrible comments left me feeling powerless, intimidated and enraged; it proves my point even more and highlights how dangerous the world can be when it escalates from being ‘harmless’ comments.

Statistics from Amnesty International’s latest report, link here.

Can social media become your horticultural tutor?

Being self-employed means I work alone. It’s hard to experience new things/be exposed to new gardening techniques when I don’t have a traditional, real life, role model; so I’ve let the people I interact with on social media become mine.

After a few years as a gardener, you find yourself beginning to repeat what you’ve done year after year; using the same tools, same techniques, sowing similar seeds and planting the same plants.

Last year, I challenged myself to follow every new person I came across on social media that would enhance my horticultural knowledge; botanists that specialise in unique plants, garden maintenance business owners that thrive and private gardeners who have long-term experience etc.

It’s provided a great wealth of knowledge and taught me things that makes jobs easier and a lot quicker. I’ve also discovered new plants that have diversified my planting plants.

Instagram is most valuable for video content, which is easy to follow; horticultural theory can be complicated to understand. It’s also great for tool reviews, there are so many different tools on the market and finding one suitable is difficult. Twitter is best for discovering unusual plant species, seed exchanges, diagnosing a pest/disease and general chat!

It’s also nice to upload a post and be given confirmation that what you’re doing is correct!

Some of the best (I could have continued this list for days):

  1. @fittleworthhousegardens
  2. @stvnhwrd14
  3. @ljclementsgardener
  4. @s.hockenhull
  5. @thomasdstone
  6. @mightyoaksfromtinyacorns
  7. @rekha181
  8. @botanygeek
  9. @alysfowler
  10. @headgardenerLC
  11. @DHgardening
  12. @londnplantology
  13. @j.l.perrone
  14. @hugh.cassidy
  15. @papaver

 

Let me know who else I should follow in the comments!

 

*NOTE: as a professional horticulturist you should study for qualifications.*

Toolkit

Tools need to be clean and sharp to be useful. Tool maintenance is essential so you aren’t buying new tools every spring!

The most used items in my toolkit include:

  1. Secateurs: Felco
  2. A Dutch hoe: Spear and Jackson
  3. Hori-hori: Niwaki
  4. Broom
  5. Leaf grabs
  6. Garden spade: Bulldog
  7. Garden fork: Bulldog
  8. Shears: Niwaki/Spear and Jackson
  9. Loppers: Spear and Jackson
  10. Pruning saw: Silky

Top 3 machinery:

  1. Stihl HSA86 hedge trimmer
  2. Stihl FS40 strimmer
  3. Stihl MS170 chainsaw

Ladder in image above is a Niwaki Tripod ladder.

Giveaway!

Eleanor Owens Gardening’s first GIVEAWAY!

#WIN a beautiful Gardening Journal to help you get organised this Summer. Head over to  my Facebook page to find out how to enter!

The 3 winners will be selected at random at 6pm on 17th July 2017 and announced on Facebook. Open to UK residents aged 18 or over only.

Good luck!